A Heartache Is A Real Pain

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Have you ever wondered why breaking up with someone makes your chest area feel so tight that it literally hurts? When you call it quits with a person, you care for or maybe even love, the pain all over your body is too much. You will experience headaches, body aches, and your heart will literally feel this excruciating pain. It’s like as if your world has ended, and that there is no way to fix it and or make it better.

 

What People Do To Getting Rid Of Their Broken Heart (But To No Avail)

You watch Netflix or read stories in Episode. People drown their sorrows in social media or other internet websites to pass the time. Some consume large amounts of wine or beer, while others are over-exercise or clean the house until their hands bleed. No matter what you do, the pain in your heart is there. It does not go away quickly, and even if you cry so hard or scream so loud, the fact remains that your heart is broken.

 

Science Proves What Happens To The Body When One Experiences A Broken Heart

 

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  1. The brain will tell the body that it is hurting.

“Pain can accompany even necessary break-ups and emotional gains. While many of us may be relieved to see an unsatisfying relationships take its last gasp, some may feel acute pain when forced to acknowledge that a relationship or friendship has run its course,” says Suzanne Degges-White Ph.D.

When you break-up with your boyfriend or girlfriend or separate from your spouse (whom you still love), the pain is like no other. It’s like you’ve been physically sucker-punched and at times, while it’s still new, you will be hyperventilating. A psychologist terms this pain as “social rejection” and it is a real pain.

 

  1. It is highly probable that you will get fat or thin because the body will want to eat less or overeat.

 

You will be very sad because of what happened, and it’s understandable. And because you’re feeling that way, your mind will want to binge-eat or won’t like to eat much at all. It is terrible because overeating or under eating is not healthy. The body will experience headaches and stomach pains due to behavior.

 

  1. After a break-up, your body will release stress hormones.

 

Well, naturally, that is the case! When a person is so much in love, the body will release “happy” hormones called oxytocin and dopamine. In opposite, if the person is heartbroken, the body will release stress hormones called cortisol and epinephrine. When there is an abundance of cortisol in the system, the muscles will tense up and swell. It causes head pains, stiff neck, and that choking feeling.

 

  1. Depression is inevitable and expected.

“Depression is not a weakness of character, laziness, or a phase. Only one out of four individuals [with depression] seeks treatment. The reason more don’t go for psychotherapy or medication is stigma. They worry they’ll be labeled, deemed undesirable, and other such things,” says Deborah Serani PsyD.

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Upon breaking up with your loved one, you will experience a sudden decline in your self-esteem. If you have self-image problems, it is two times as likely to initiate a depressed state compared to other issues. If you are depressed, your head will hurt a lot.

 

Again, the matter is about rejection, and how your ex-lover rejected you and wanted to move on without you. There was a study about this one conducted by scientists from Virginia Commonwealth University.

 

  1. Love is your drug; therefore, there will be a withdrawal.

 

After a break-up, you will experience “withdrawal.” It is reasonable considering love is your drug, and you’re an addict to it. Withdrawal from anything will manifest many types of body pains. The problem is not just emotional. It is also physical.

 

While it may seem that sulking and locking in your bedroom while eating a tub of Ben and Jerry’s is the best therapy for a broken heart, it’s really not. Put your sneakers on and some casual clothes. Apply lipstick (for girls), or shave your beard (for guys), then take a walk. It’s better to heal doing things that will uplift your spirit rather than sleeping, eating and moping around.

“As the grieving process progresses you will begin to see your way through to a point at which you can let go in a more proactive and self-protective way—a way that you may eventually come to understand as a new beginning,” says Suzanne Lachmann Psy.D. when explaining about the grieving process of a break up.

Categories: Pain Management

2015 Houston Physical Therapy Convention: How To Avoid Injuries

Staying away from injuries is the primary focus of the 2015 Houston Physical Therapy Convention. There was a study during the same year, after all, wherein the researchers found out that having your problematic body part rehabilitated early could lower your medical costs during the first year by 72 percent. Thus, if you could avoid inflicting pain on yourself physically, there won’t be a necessity for you even to get a consultation.

Here are the tips to prevent needing physical therapy now.

  1. Fix Your Posture

The first thing you can do wherever you are is to sit or stand properly. You cannot slump at any time – that will add unnecessary weight to your spine. It will then cause strain on your back, which may force you later to see a therapist. Moreover, bad posture can give you headaches and balance issues in the future.

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  1. Lift Things With Care

Whether you are picking up a heavy box off the floor or lifting a barbell over your head, you should realize that there are proper ways to do it. Say, for the former, it is better to squat first instead of bending forward. When it comes to the latter, you need to distribute the object’s weight all over the body so that your shoulders, arms, and back won’t hurt.

  1. Strengthen Your Hips

It also matters to take note of the fact that injuries on lower body parts are typically due to weak hips. What it entails is that the muscles in the area cannot handle physical activities such as running or walking. Hence, you need to consider doing exercises that are meant for the hips to avoid requiring rehab later.

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  1. Stretch Daily

Last but not least, you shouldn’t forget to do some stretching, regardless if you have plans on working out or not. When you come from a deep slumber, you see, your muscles and joints stayed idle for hours. You might strain them if you head to work and perform tasks there without conditioning your body first.

Take care of your physical well-being today. Good luck!

 

Categories: Understanding Pain

Is Your Husband Suffering From Chronic Pain?

In the United States, chronic pain is considered as one of the major causes of disability in many persons. As early as now, it is significant to highlight the fact that chronic pain pertains to several disorders. This means that there are different kinds of chronic pain that a particular individual may suffer.

“We all know that it is unpleasant to live with pain. What we don’t know, however, is how to manage our pain. We try to avoid pain, but we don’t always do it in the most appropriate way,” says Ana Nogales, Ph.D.

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Categories: Pain Management

How Can Your Marriage Stay Intact When Dealing With Lupus?

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The array of worries that a lupus patient thinks of depends on what age you received the diagnosis. If you’re still a teen, you might assume that chronic illness will make it harder for you to go well with your peers. Once you reach young adulthood, your thoughts may transition to whether you’ll be able to find a job or not. And when you hit the marrying age, it’s possible for you to worry about not meeting a man who will stay by your side in sickness and in health. 

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Categories: Understanding Pain

Why A Relationship Ends When One Has A Chronic Illness

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Have you ever heard of endless love? 

We do not mean the song that Lionel Richie and Diana Ross sang together way back in 1981. It’s the never-ending kind of affection that you can give to a person irrespective of their race, gender, or financial status. If you think about it, it’s almost like casting a binding magic spell on the people involved since you can’t seem to let go of each other no matter how many obstacles you come across. 

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Categories: Understanding Pain

Five Things You Should Know About Yoga

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Ever felt that sudden rush of peace and energy right after a good workout session? Or even after a lap or two in your subdivision in a chill quiet morning, insight the sun rising to its majesty, the cities still snoring and the birds chirping harmoniously in the near.

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Categories: Pain Management

When You Are Emotionally In Pain, Can It Become Physical Too?

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The human mind does not only regulate emotions. It also processes pain, whether it’s a pain from a broken arm or gout. Pain and emotion share space in the brain and the appropriate emotions can positively affect physical pain.

Ashley Boynes-Shuck, a blogger and health promoter from Pittsburgh, suffered from idiopathic arthritis and severe constant pain as early as ten years of age. According to her, having a positive, optimistic, and hopeful outlook in life as well as concentrating on helping other people is a marvelous way of coping with the pain.

Pain And Emotion Share The Same Space Inside The Human Mind

Inflammation in certain parts of the body, such as in rheumatoid arthritis can continue to create pain signals in the brain even though there is no physical injury. Pain from getting hurt physically or from a surgical procedure can still be felt even after the recovery of the body. The short-lived aching due to an injury is replaced by continuing, chronic pain that persists freely.

“Brain” published a study done in 2013 on a group of people for more than 12 months whose minor pain elevated to persistent and chronic physical illnesses. Dr. David Hanscom, an orthopedic spine surgeon at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute in Seattle, said that the pain felt by the patients increased from minor to extreme and the acute pain center was linked with their emotional center.

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Pain Can Be Adversely Affected By Negative Emotions

The emotions you feel can affect you physically because emotions, negative or positive, share the same real estate as the sensory centers of the brain. Boynes-Shuck related that when she was down emotionally about her illnesses, she was not in the mood to socialize. She didn’t even want to go out at all. Exercise and social interaction can alleviate pain, but people with chronic pain usually don’t do it. And according to Darnall, negative emotions such as fear, anger, sadness, or depression can increase the pain being processed by your brain.

The pain felt by those suffering from it can also lead to adverse reactions. Managing pain daily can result in feelings of frustration, disgust, and stress. There are more or less 100 million Americans suffering from chronic pain, and they tend to develop depression or an anxiety issue. And take note, depressed patients are at three times at risk of suffering from chronic pain.

Lisa Harris, from Waynesville, Ohio, has had psoriatic arthritis since her mid-thirties. She states that she ’doesn’t want to leave her house to socialize with friends or to visit relatives because of the pain she experiences.

Pain Can Be Positively Affected By Positive Emotions

Darnall states that knowing that emotions affect how pain is experienced is helpful, but only if you obtain the appropriate skills to influence your experience.

There are various ways of dealing with chronic pain. You can have yourself assessed by a pain specialist, doctor, or a pain psychologist. Or you could try biofeedback, acupuncture or yoga. And any form of exercise is the right way of alleviating pain. According to Darnall, which method works differs with different individuals depending on the age and their condition. The best strategy is to face the situation in many different angles and to consult medical professionals.

Many medical professionals have themselves experienced chronic pain. Dr. Hanscom suffered from chronic back discomfort for almost 15 years. He decided to look for options other than surgery. In his book, “Back in Control,” his strategy for dealing with chronic pain includes ways on how to sleep soundly, managing his stress and taking medication for the aching, coupled with meditative-type methods to shift his brain from the pain pathways to no-pain conduits. However, Hanscom skirts the issue of emotions and chronic pain, stating feeling is but a very shallow connection to it.

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You Can Be Free From Pain

The close relationship between pain and emotions should not be a source of personal blame for people suffering from chronic pain. Darnall states that explaining the relationship between depression and feelings is about empowering people and not about blaming them. Harris shifted to a new pain management medicine for her psoriatic arthritis, and her symptoms improved, but she reports that having a transformed rapport with her family. She can now enjoy things like playing with her kids and coaching her youngest child in cheerleading, which has helped relieve her aches and pain.

Hanscom has mentioned that his patients were freed from pain using his strategies. However, there are many individuals with chronic pain who will still feel some level of pain. Despite this, their emotional state can even help them deal with their chronic pain. Boynes-Shuck states that some days are terrible for her, but daily, her attitude determines what kind of day ’she’s going to have.

Categories: Understanding Pain

Emotional Pain: How To Deal With It

 

 

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In life’s journey, you often encounter situations that result in emotional pain. “Emotional pain can become an addiction to some people. Overwhelmed with feelings like sadness, depression, guilt, shame or fear, these emotions become so common and constant that you may feel like it’s a part of you and you can’t imagine life without it,” according to Elizabeth Hartney, PhD.

In his book, Emotional First Aid, Guy Winch, a blogger from Psychology Today, lists seven such cases and provides tips on how to deal with them.

The first situation is rejection. It is natural to feel pain when a family member stops talking to you or your friends start ignoring you. Winch suggests four tips. First, stop criticizing yourself. Second, be aware of your strengths. Third, search for other people to replace the ones who rejected you. Last, prepare yourself for upcoming rejections by practicing on minor rejections that are easily surmounted.

The second situation is the loneliness. Loneliness can be a vicious cycle wherein the longer you go without socializing with others, the harder it is to make new friends or keep in touch with old friends. If you believe that no one cares about you or that other people are thinking negatively of you, Winch suggests you fight that belief with logical counterarguments. Winch also suggests practicing empathy, such as getting a pet that you can care for.

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The third situation is loss and trauma. It is perfectly normal to feel suffering when you lose someone you love or when you have a traumatic experience. Winch suggests that you give yourself time to heal and to try to ease the pain using your usual coping methods.

The fourth situation is guilt. Winch lists three kinds of guilt. There’s unresolved guilt wherein you feel that you have not adequately apologized to someone you have wronged. Then there’s survivor guilt wherein you survive a situation that has one or more other fatalities. And finally there’s separation guilt wherein you believe you don’t deserve an independent and successful life. For unresolved guilt, Winch recommends that you apologize. For survivor and separation guilt, Winch advises that you apologize to yourself and then to forgive yourself.

The fifth situation is rumination. Rumination happens when you mentally go over and over your unhappy memories. Winch recommends that you tell yourself that other people do not see your mistakes in the same magnitude as you do. What seems to be a significant failure on your part might seem minor to others, or they may not even be aware of it. Winch also recommends distracting yourself and turning your mind to other thoughts. If you are angry at someone, try to see the positive side. If someone is insulting you or putting you down, view their words as constructive criticism and try to use them as opportunities for self-improvement.

“I can recognize that I have the strength, resilience, and value to heal this hurt over time. I will stay true to my deepest values, focus on creating more value in my life, reach out to friends and other loved ones, recognize human frailty in my spouse and in myself, evaluate my options for a better future.” These words were uttered by Steven Stosny, Ph.D. for you to move on and heal.

The sixth situation is a failure. Emotional pain can result from shame due to breakdowns. Anxiety can also result from a fear of failure. Fear of making a mistake can even result in actual self-fulfilling failure. Winch’s recommendation is to talk to some close to you. They can provide emotional support and help you see the situation in a brighter light. For fear of failure, Winch suggests distracting yourself and using humor to cope with real or imagined shortcomings.

 

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And the seventh situation is low self-esteem. Having low esteem can be a vicious cycle lowering your self-esteem even further. It makes you vulnerable to other people’s criticisms. It makes you doubt your abilities leading to your inadequate performance in your activities. Winch’s recommendations for the different situations that result in emotional pain can be used to deal with low self-esteem but in greater quantity. This includes being compassionate to yourself and focusing on your strengths. Winch also recommends that you practice mindfulness, exercise willpower, and admit to yourself that you will fail sometimes.

Winch’s tips and recommendations can be categorized as cognitive-behavioral therapy, wherein changes in thoughts and behavior result in changes in one’s emotions. But if Winch’s strategies do not work, you should seek help from a mental health professional. As Elyssa Barbash Ph.D. said, “These people want to feel healthy and be free from distress, so they are more willing to actively engage in therapy in order to make changes.”

Most of the situations people encounter that result in emotional pain can be dealt with using Winch’s suggestions. You can use these strategies to prevent you from wallowing in emotional distress.

Categories: Pain Management